International Association of Educators   |  ISSN: 1949-4270   |  e-ISSN: 1949-4289

Original article | Educational Policy Analysis and Strategic Research 2023, Vol. 18(3) 8-20

A Critical Analysis of the Concepts of Identity, Nation, Nationalism in Museum Studies

Martina Riedler Eryaman

pp. 8 - 20   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/epasr.2023.600.1   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2309-12-0007

Published online: September 30, 2023  |   Number of Views: 67  |  Number of Download: 236


Abstract

National identity is a complex and contested issue, and it is often debated in the fields of social and cultural studies. Museum collections, and the way they are presented and interpreted, are closely linked to national identity. National museums, as symbols of national unity, can manipulate perceptions about dominant ideologies and the individual's place in society. This article aims to deepen our understanding of how national museums negotiate and construct national identity by critically analyzing the theories and concepts of nation, nationalism, and national identity.

Keywords: Identity, Nation, Nationalism, Museum Studies, Education


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Eryaman, M.R. (2023). A Critical Analysis of the Concepts of Identity, Nation, Nationalism in Museum Studies . Educational Policy Analysis and Strategic Research, 18(3), 8-20. doi: 10.29329/epasr.2023.600.1

Harvard
Eryaman, M. (2023). A Critical Analysis of the Concepts of Identity, Nation, Nationalism in Museum Studies . Educational Policy Analysis and Strategic Research, 18(3), pp. 8-20.

Chicago 16th edition
Eryaman, Martina Riedler (2023). "A Critical Analysis of the Concepts of Identity, Nation, Nationalism in Museum Studies ". Educational Policy Analysis and Strategic Research 18 (3):8-20. doi:10.29329/epasr.2023.600.1.

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